Graviton Fast Start – A New Program to Help Move Your Workloads to AWS Graviton

With the Graviton Challenge last year, we helped customers migrate to Graviton-based EC2 instances and get up to 40 percent price performance benefit in as little as 4 days. Tens of thousands of customers, including 48 of the top 50 Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) customers, use AWS Graviton processors for their workloads. In addition to EC2, many AWS managed services can run their workloads on Graviton. For most customers, adoption is easy, requiring minimal code changes. However, the effort and time required to move workloads to Graviton depends on a few factors including your software development environment and the technology stack on which your application is built.

This year, we want to take it a step further and make it even easier for customers to adopt Graviton not only through EC2, but also through managed services. Today, we are launching AWS Graviton Fast Start, a new program that makes it even easier to move your workloads to AWS Graviton by providing step-by-step directions for EC2 and other managed services that support the Graviton platform:

  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) – EC2 provides the most flexible environment for a migration and can support many kinds of workloads, such as web apps, custom databases, or analytics. You have full control over the interpreted or compiled code running in the EC2 instance. You can also use many open-source and commercial software products that support the Arm64 architecture.
  • AWS Lambda – Migrating your serverless functions can be really easy, especially if you use an interpreted runtime such as Node.js or Python. Most of the time, you only have to check the compatibility of your software dependencies. I have shown a few examples in this blog post.
  • AWS Fargate – Fargate works best if your applications are already running in containers or if you are planning to containerize them. By using multi-architecture container images or images that have Arm64 in their image manifest, you get the serverless benefits of Fargate and the price-performance advantages of Graviton.
  • Amazon Aurora – Relational databases are at the core of many applications. If you need a database compatible with PostgreSQL or MySQL, you can use Amazon Aurora to have a highly performant and globally available database powered by Graviton.
  • Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) – Similarly to Aurora, Amazon RDS engines such as PostgreSQL, MySQL, and MariaDB can provide a fully managed relational database service using Graviton-based instances.
  • Amazon ElastiCache – When your workload requires ultra-low latency and high throughput, you can speed up your applications with ElastiCache and have a fully managed in-memory cache running on Graviton and compatible with Redis or Memcached.
  • Amazon EMR – With Amazon EMR, you can run large-scale distributed data processing jobs, interactive SQL queries, and machine learning applications on Graviton using open-source analytics frameworks such as Apache SparkApache Hive, and Presto.

Here’s some feedback we got from customers running their workloads on Graviton:

  • Formula 1 racing told us that Graviton2-based C6gn instances provided the best price performance benefits for some of their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) workloads. More recently, they found that Graviton3 C7g instances are 40 percent faster for the same simulations and expect Graviton3-based instances to become the optimal choice to run all of their CFD workloads.
  • Honeycomb has 100 percent of their production workloads running on Graviton using EC2 and Lambda. They have tested the high-throughput telemetry ingestion workload they use for their observability platform against early preview instances of Graviton3 and have seen a 35 percent performance increase for their workload over Graviton2. They were able to run 30 percent fewer instances of C7g than C6g serving the same workload and with 30 percent reduced latency. With these instances in production, they expect over 50 percent price performance improvement over x86 instances.
  • Twitter is working on a multi-year project to leverage Graviton-based EC2 instances to deliver Twitter timelines. As part of their ongoing effort to drive further efficiencies, they tested the new Graviton3-based C7g instances. Across a number of benchmarks representative of their workloads, they found Graviton3-based C7g instances deliver 20-80 percent higher performance compared to Graviton2-based C6g instances, while also reducing tail latencies by as much as 35 percent. They are excited to utilize Graviton3-based instances in the future to realize significant price performance benefits.

With all these options, getting the benefits of running all or part of your workload on AWS Graviton can be easier than you expect. To help you get started, there’s also a free trial on the Graviton-based T4g instances for up to 750 hours per month through December 31st, 2022.

Visit AWS Graviton Fast Start to get step-by-step directions on how to move your workloads to AWS Graviton.

Danilo

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